Question 2 Up Capacity


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  1. #1
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    2 Up Capacity

    Hey To All,
    I have searched through the threads looking for information about load capacity and passengers. I believe the manual says 404lbs of capacity. Is 404lbs the gospel, or would I be ok if my total capacity with a passenger was around 40-60 pounds over? That is what it would be with myself and the Boss on board. It would only be really short trips, but I am always cautious about carrying capacities with my truck and trailers. I have never owned a bike and know I can get the scoop here in the Cafe. I have a 2007 VTX1300C. Thanks...Hillbilly

  2. #2
    Madness_MC's Avatar
    Madness_MC is offline Senior Member South Carolina Riders Group
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    Hillbilly -

    Have you heard the one about the straw that broke the camel's back???

    Actually, if you're running a "few" pounds over, I'd say not to worry (much). Keep about 40 pounds of pressure in the rear and 38-40 in the front. You may wish to consider a set of Heavy-duty Progressive shocks in the rear (standard 12" length, thank you) and a set of Progressive springs (non-lowering type) in the front.

    If you follow those recommendations and be mindful of possible more rapid brake wear, you should be fine. My wife made me loose 60 lbs. and her 15 lbs., so that we wouldn't over-load out poor, little VTX1300.

    Just employ the common sense that you have exhibited by posting your question and you should be just fine.

  3. #3
    Bassdude404's Avatar
    Bassdude404 is offline The guitar, not the fish!
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    We rode over 800 miles on our trip to the Honda Homecoming last summer...500 of that was with both of us, and all the accessories I added (which at that time was actually over that 404 #), and all our gear that we had packed....Bike gave us no problems at all...That load rating they state is for the tires...I run my air pressures at 40/40, so that increases the load rating a bit more than the stock tire pressure that Honda recommends...

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    I haven't had a problem with riding 2 up and my total weight is close to what you're asking about. As long as you keep the tires at the right psi and adjust your shocks for the most comfortable ride you should be good to go.

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    We have riden over by about the same amount if not more for 2 years now and we will have the saddle bags loaded. I run 40 psi in the rear and 38 in the front and I adjusted the shocks up one or two notches. We have had no problems.

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    Madness_MC is offline Senior Member South Carolina Riders Group
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    It's not a question of "having problems". Every vehicle is designed to operate within a certain margin for many various specifications. The 404 lb. carrying capacity is based upon the design of the suspension, brakes and tires to safely operate under all possible conditions at that "maximum" weight load.

    I've had 1 TONS of cinder blocks in the back end of a 1987 Chevy Astro Van for 50 miles of varying road conditions.
    Did it carry the weight - yes.
    Did the suspension sag a bit - definitely !!
    Did it take a bit longer to stop the vehicle from normal driving speeds - absolutely !!!

    Would the brakes wear out faster if I continually kept carrying that load - most assuredly.
    Would my rear springs start to sag and allow the steering geometry to be effected so that handling was not as positive as it should be OR under some circumstances the vehicle was not as sure-footed and therefore not as safe - you could feel the difference, without a doubt.
    If I hadn't made certain that the (6-ply) tires were "properly inflated" before attempting this feat, I feel certain that I would have been replacing tires due to sidewall blow-outs.

    This is an extreme example of over-loading a vehicle, but all the same principles apply. While tire pressure is a very important factor, suspension and brakes must also be taken into account (other than kicking up the rear shock pre-load a notch or two).

    You can compensate in other, more proper ways. Explore the possibilities!!!

  7. #7
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    yz125mm700 is offline Senior Member Minnesota Riders Group
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madness_MC View Post
    It's not a question of "having problems". Every vehicle is designed to operate within a certain margin for many various specifications. The 404 lb. carrying capacity is based upon the design of the suspension, brakes and tires to safely operate under all possible conditions at that "maximum" weight load.

    I've had 1 TONS of cinder blocks in the back end of a 1987 Chevy Astro Van for 50 miles of varying road conditions.
    Did it carry the weight - yes.
    Did the suspension sag a bit - definitely !!
    Did it take a bit longer to stop the vehicle from normal driving speeds - absolutely !!!

    Would the brakes wear out faster if I continually kept carrying that load - most assuredly.
    Would my rear springs start to sag and allow the steering geometry to be effected so that handling was not as positive as it should be OR under some circumstances the vehicle was not as sure-footed and therefore not as safe - you could feel the difference, without a doubt.
    If I hadn't made certain that the (6-ply) tires were "properly inflated" before attempting this feat, I feel certain that I would have been replacing tires due to sidewall blow-outs.

    This is an extreme example of over-loading a vehicle, but all the same principles apply. While tire pressure is a very important factor, suspension and brakes must also be taken into account (other than kicking up the rear shock pre-load a notch or two).

    You can compensate in other, more proper ways. Explore the possibilities!!!

    ha I agree, that just made me think of the early 80's chevette. With 350-400 pounds of anything in the car, the wheelbearings were technicaly overloaded.

  8. #8
    jschin1000 is offline jschin1000 Indiana Riders Group
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    Man that Chevette comment made me flashback - when I was 19, i brought home about 125 2X6's to build a deck with in my Chevette. Had to unbolt the passenger seat and just loaded it until I couldnt fit anymore. Also used to put my 250R 3 wheeler in the back - front end hanging out and back wheels tied in. Abused that poor thing!

  9. #9
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    wanderingbear is offline Senior Member Florida Riders Group

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    They always give a low figure just for liablity reasons. I wouldn't sweat rhe small stuff.

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