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Damn, I'm getting old... updated pic of a mad scientist... :patriot:

P.S. I don't usually drink my beer with a straw... haha... just hamming it up on vacation at Lake George in Bolton Landing, NY :cheers:

2nd P.S. Also, my scientific hero was proven right, yet again, 100 years after developing his General Theory of Relativity - LIGO has detected gravitational waves for the 1st time ever (a very, very big deal in the science of cosmology), and I actually had a little something to do with it back in the very early days of the experiment's conception (late-1980's)

Read about the LIGO breaking news here: http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/when-two-black-holes-collide/462279/ and here: https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/

so.. here is question from a limited knowledged science person... lol... a quote from the artice "LIGO is particularly attuned to “high-pitched” waves made by pairs of black holes or pulsars right before they collide." is there a particular reason that LIGO is tuned to a specific frequency or wave length....or is it designed that it will pick up any and then determine what level it is on. I hope i am asking this correctly. Also... can it be used for something other (not to diminish it's current accomplishments for future accomplishments) than searching for these ... waves or occurances.

just curious... .Ride On Mad Scientist!!! Ride on!
 
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so.. here is question from a limited knowledged science person... lol... a quote from the artice "LIGO is particularly attuned to “high-pitched” waves made by pairs of black holes or pulsars right before they collide." is there a particular reason that LIGO is tuned to a specific frequency or wave length....or is it designed that it will pick up any and then determine what level it is on. I hope i am asking this correctly. Also... can it be used for something other (not to diminish it's current accomplishments for future accomplishments) than searching for these ... waves or occurances.

just curious... .Ride On Mad Scientist!!! Ride on!
Great question! The reason Advanced LIGO was so successful on its inaugural search, is because it is tuned to detect intense and powerful (high amplitude) gravitational wave sources that we know exist, and are relatively ‘nearby’. Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to gravitational waves having ~1 million meter wavelength, corresponding to a frequency of ~300Hz. It is ‘tuned’ to this frequency because nearby cosmic events that create the highest amplitudes create gravitational waves around this wavelength. The collision of the two black holes that Advanced LIGO detected had a very high gravitational wave amplitude and, hence, were ‘loud’ enough for it to detect. LIGO is essentially a giant laser interferometer that senses the compression and rarefaction of the space-time continuum.

Mark :patriot:

Here’s a couple of references to help sort it out:

“On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz… It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole.” [PhysRevLett.116.061102]

“The ‘loudness’ of a gravitational wave depends on what’s producing it, and how close the source is to Earth. Strong gravity makes for loud waves, so objects like binary pulsars are the good sources, and black holes are best because they are even more extreme. The collision LIGO spotted consisted of two black holes respectively 36 and 29 times the mass of the Sun, but much denser… When those two black holes crashed together 1.3 billion years ago, they sent out an amazingly powerful burst of gravitational waves, loud enough for LIGO to detect from that astounding distance. If you could hear the waves, they would start on a low note and rapidly sweep up the scale to higher and higher pitches (technically known as a “chirp”, since it resembles the sound many birds make) as the black holes spiral inward, sweeping toward each other inexorably, all the while increasing in volume until the actual collision—and a phenomenally intense burst of waves… Since calculations show that collisions of black holes like this are rare, many thought they weren’t great sources for LIGO. That this was the very first thing LIGO ever saw means either we were lucky, or black-hole collisions are more common than we thought. Either is a fascinating possibility, which LIGO researchers will sort out in the coming years.” [http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/when-two-black-holes-collide/462279/]
 

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Great question! The reason Advanced LIGO was so successful on its inaugural search, is because it is tuned to detect intense and powerful (high amplitude) gravitational wave sources that we know exist, and are relatively ‘nearby’. Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to gravitational waves having ~1 million meter wavelength, corresponding to a frequency of ~300Hz. It is ‘tuned’ to this frequency because nearby cosmic events that create the highest amplitudes create gravitational waves around this wavelength. The collision of the two black holes that Advanced LIGO detected had a very high gravitational wave amplitude and, hence, were ‘loud’ enough for it to detect. LIGO is essentially a giant laser interferometer that senses the compression and rarefaction of the space-time continuum.

Mark :patriot:

Here’s a couple of references to help sort it out:

“On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz… It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole.” [PhysRevLett.116.061102]

“The ‘loudness’ of a gravitational wave depends on what’s producing it, and how close the source is to Earth. Strong gravity makes for loud waves, so objects like binary pulsars are the good sources, and black holes are best because they are even more extreme. The collision LIGO spotted consisted of two black holes respectively 36 and 29 times the mass of the Sun, but much denser… When those two black holes crashed together 1.3 billion years ago, they sent out an amazingly powerful burst of gravitational waves, loud enough for LIGO to detect from that astounding distance. If you could hear the waves, they would start on a low note and rapidly sweep up the scale to higher and higher pitches (technically known as a “chirp”, since it resembles the sound many birds make) as the black holes spiral inward, sweeping toward each other inexorably, all the while increasing in volume until the actual collision—and a phenomenally intense burst of waves… Since calculations show that collisions of black holes like this are rare, many thought they weren’t great sources for LIGO. That this was the very first thing LIGO ever saw means either we were lucky, or black-hole collisions are more common than we thought. Either is a fascinating possibility, which LIGO researchers will sort out in the coming years.” [http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/when-two-black-holes-collide/462279/]
wow... Mark... -------> this is me after your reply...:banghead: lol... that response blew my mind... i had to read it several times to get it to stick but know that i could never carry on a conversation about this as I cannot fathom the breadth of the conversation. I admire you for your knowledge and understanding, and for the passion you have towards it. It is amazing that you comprehend this stuff. I do find if fascinating..the sheer size of space, man's ability and knowledge to be able to measure, search and discover, postulate theories and then be able to articulate that information for those that cannot do that. Real admiration for you.

i will have to do more reading up on this as it is fascinating.... one last question.... apologize for the bluntness and ridiculously entry level of it.... but why? What do we hope to derive from such an experiment? if this is not the place for it.. thats ok... just thought i would question.....
 
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<snip>one last question.... apologize for the bluntness and ridiculously entry level of it.... but why? What do we hope to derive from such an experiment? if this is not the place for it.. thats ok... just thought i would question.....
This is always a concern with basic research, especially research of such an esoteric nature as fundamental physics. History has shown great benefits from almost all of this sort of research. If it wasn't for basic research into physics in the 1900-1940 period, we would not have nuclear fission power and the potential in the future for the almost limitless power of nuclear fusion. Imagine (warning... need a big imagination for this) 300 years in the future if Man could harness, control, and use gravitational waves to yield artificial gravity, provide thrust for vehicles, temporarily elminate or cancel out weight (or maybe mass), etc. The possibilities are nearly endless. Sure these all sound like impossible science fiction but then most of today's technology would have have sounded like impossible science fiction 200 years ago and most of it is based on fundamental research and discoveries in physics.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Great question! The reason Advanced LIGO was so successful on its inaugural search, is because it is tuned to detect intense and powerful (high amplitude) gravitational wave sources that we know exist, and are relatively ‘nearby’. Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to gravitational waves having ~1 million meter wavelength, corresponding to a frequency of ~300Hz. It is ‘tuned’ to this frequency because nearby cosmic events that create the highest amplitudes create gravitational waves around this wavelength. The collision of the two black holes that Advanced LIGO detected had a very high gravitational wave amplitude and, hence, were ‘loud’ enough for it to detect. LIGO is essentially a giant laser interferometer that senses the compression and rarefaction of the space-time continuum.

Mark :patriot:

Here’s a couple of references to help sort it out:

“On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz… It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole.” [PhysRevLett.116.061102]

“The ‘loudness’ of a gravitational wave depends on what’s producing it, and how close the source is to Earth. Strong gravity makes for loud waves, so objects like binary pulsars are the good sources, and black holes are best because they are even more extreme. The collision LIGO spotted consisted of two black holes respectively 36 and 29 times the mass of the Sun, but much denser… When those two black holes crashed together 1.3 billion years ago, they sent out an amazingly powerful burst of gravitational waves, loud enough for LIGO to detect from that astounding distance. If you could hear the waves, they would start on a low note and rapidly sweep up the scale to higher and higher pitches (technically known as a “chirp”, since it resembles the sound many birds make) as the black holes spiral inward, sweeping toward each other inexorably, all the while increasing in volume until the actual collision—and a phenomenally intense burst of waves… Since calculations show that collisions of black holes like this are rare, many thought they weren’t great sources for LIGO. That this was the very first thing LIGO ever saw means either we were lucky, or black-hole collisions are more common than we thought. Either is a fascinating possibility, which LIGO researchers will sort out in the coming years.” [http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/when-two-black-holes-collide/462279/]

Great picture of you before this post. Geez, unfortunately you lost me soon after the opening words.... The Reason LIGO...........
 
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This is a pic of yourself thread right?
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wow... Mark... -------> this is me after your reply...:banghead: lol... that response blew my mind... i had to read it several times to get it to stick but know that i could never carry on a conversation about this as I cannot fathom the breadth of the conversation. I admire you for your knowledge and understanding, and for the passion you have towards it. It is amazing that you comprehend this stuff. I do find if fascinating..the sheer size of space, man's ability and knowledge to be able to measure, search and discover, postulate theories and then be able to articulate that information for those that cannot do that. Real admiration for you.

i will have to do more reading up on this as it is fascinating.... one last question.... apologize for the bluntness and ridiculously entry level of it.... but why? What do we hope to derive from such an experiment? if this is not the place for it.. thats ok... just thought i would question.....
Thank you kindly, Earl. First, I must say that I appreciate your own articulation and curious nature. I’m abundantly certain that I could never fully answer your question: “Why?” I’m also abundantly certain that I cannot give a short answer, in trying. LOL. So here it goes, my humble attempt, in abundance: History clearly tells us that humankind has long held a fascination over the universe that surrounds our tiny oasis in space, and it is easy to understand that. All one has to do is look up at the night sky to come face to face with the mystery – what is all that which we see, and what is our place in it? In other words, why are we here? Religion is one method humans use to try to solve this mystery. Another is science. Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences. It is known that some of the earliest written records were astronomical observations (Sumerians ~3000 BC, Babylonians ~1200 BC). The Egyptians aligned the pyramids and other structures according to the stars and the sun ~2500 BC, the Chinese kept astronomical records since ~500 BC, and the ancient Greeks formalized astronomy around 400 BC. But it was all based on just that – simply looking up to the heavens with human eyes. It took another two millennia before a profound change in how humanity viewed the stars came about – in 1609, Galileo demonstrated the first practical, optical telescope for stargazing. Over the years, the advent of ever more powerful telescopes allowed us to better understand the universe and our own ‘neighborhood’, the solar system. Fast-forward another 300 years to the early 1900’s, and Albert Einstein formulated his General Theory of Relativity which kicked off the modern era in the sciences of astrophysics (why the objects in the heavens behave the way they do) and cosmology (the origin, evolution, and large scale structure of the universe). Fast forward again to the 1960’s and consider the birth of the space-age as we know it. Since then, we have been able to launch increasingly advanced instruments into space, and coupled with increasingly advanced ground-based instruments, we are able to explore and understand the universe in finer detail and across broader portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (think gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet, visible light, infrared, microwaves, radio waves) than our ancestors could have ever even imagined. And the resulting amount of knowledge gained is staggering. I could go on and on to name and describe these amazing instruments created by humankind, but I think the one example that I can give that best describes this process is the Hubble Space Telescope: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/150316-50-great-images-from-the-hubble-space-telescope/

Beyond that ‘one-of-many’ shining achievements of humanity, for example, are the recent explorations of Mars, the recent exploration of Pluto with the New Horizons spacecraft, and now Advanced LIGO and the detection of gravitational waves predicted by Einstein a century ago, but never directly detected until now. I couldn’t put it into words any better than found in this article titled “Gravitational Waves: What Their Discovery Means for Science and Humanity”, by By Calla Cofield, Space.com Staff Writer. Excerpted from that article:

“…But what is truly monumental about this detection is that it gives humanity the ability to see the universe in a totally new way, scientists said. The ability to directly detect gravitational waves — which are generated by the acceleration or deceleration of massive objects in space — has been compared to a deaf person suddenly gaining the ability to hear sound. An entirely new realm of information is now available. "It's like Galileo pointing the telescope for the first time at the sky," LIGO team member Vassiliki (Vicky) Kalogera, a professor of physics and astronomy at Northwestern University in Illinois, told Space.com. "You're opening your eyes — in this case, our ears — to a new set of signals from the universe that our previous technologies did not allow us to receive, study and learn from." "Up until now, we've been deaf to gravitational waves," LIGO Executive Director David Reitze, of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), said during an announcement ceremony in Washington, D.C. "What's going to come now is we're going to hear more things, and no doubt we'll hear things that we expected to hear … but we will also hear things that we never expected." http://www.space.com/31922-gravitational-waves-detection-what-it-means.html

So, in conclusion, let me leave you with this thought… I believe that it is humanity’s seemingly unique ability to ponder the very question, “Why?”, that leads to an insatiable and unrelenting thirst for knowledge and understanding of the mystery pondered by countless humans, myself included: “What is all that which we see, and what is our place in it? In other words, why are we here?” And now, we’ve come full-circle.

But, the reason I’m HERE is to talk about motorcycles, so I’ll stand-down on the scientific blathering and simply say… “Well, *you* started it!” :icon_chee LOL… peace, brother…

Mark :patriot:
 

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"So, in conclusion, let me leave you with this thought… I believe that it is humanity’s seemingly unique ability to ponder the very question, “Why?”, that leads to an insatiable and unrelenting thirst for knowledge and understanding of the mystery pondered by countless humans, myself included: “What is all that which we see, and what is our place in it? In other words, why are we here?” And now, we’ve come full-circle.

But, the reason I’m HERE is to talk about motorcycles, so I’ll stand-down on the scientific blathering and simply say… “Well, *you* started it!” :icon_chee LOL… peace, brother…

Mark :patriot:[/QUOTE]"


bbuwwwhhhaahhhaaaa...thats awesome and thanks for the info... and the banter....

Ride On!!!!!
 
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bbuwwwhhhaahhhaaaa...thats awesome and thanks for the info... and the banter....

Ride On!!!!!
You're welcome, Earl, it's my pleasure - just doin' what I love...


Mark you already know I'm a fan brother but you never cease to amaze me!!!! :mosh:
Thanks kindly, Mike :icon_chee

Now, shall we talk about this weird weather? :hmm2: Here in NH, -11F this morning in Brookline (colder than a witch's tit in a brass bra) and tomorrow, 52F and rain... :shrug: Criminies!
 

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Puts life in a whole other perspective having grandbabies!!!!! I spoil mine as much as I can!!!!
 

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Damn, I'm getting old... updated pic of a mad scientist... :patriot:

P.S. I don't usually drink my beer with a straw... haha... just hamming it up on vacation at Lake George in Bolton Landing, NY :cheers:

2nd P.S. Also, my scientific hero was proven right, yet again, 100 years after developing his General Theory of Relativity - LIGO has detected gravitational waves for the 1st time ever (a very, very big deal in the science of cosmology), and I actually had a little something to do with it back in the very early days of the experiment's conception (late-1980's)

Read about the LIGO breaking news here: http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/when-two-black-holes-collide/462279/ and here: https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/

Pretty cool stuff, coming from a computer nerd! Thanks for sharing...I think I'm a little smarter today!
 

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Thats cool!
 
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This guy needs all 1800cc
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With my nephew. He wanted a mustache like his Uncle Nate.

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At "work", at one of our Harley Davidson stores.
 
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