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find another mechanic. a much Better ONE.

that is no way to treat a customer

to tell a customer the engine block is cracked, WITHOUT a proper investigation
vacuum test.
oil pressure test.
air pressure test.
chemical die test.
but FIRST a proper and complete cleaning of the engine is the first step.
 

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2007 VTX 1300R, Indianapolis
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find another mechanic. a much Better ONE.

that is no way to treat a customer
That was my thought as well.
Probably something simple that can be fixed and if engine was shut off when oil ran out it might be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Thx guys. Insurance adjuster comes Tuesday and then I’m going to bring it home, got it off the ground, put a spotlight on it, put some oil into it and fire it up to see what the heck is going on.
I also retraced my steps today, the route I took, when I had the incident. There were no potholes where the on-ramp was flooded. Even more interesting... after swamping the bike I pulled off the highway and into a parking lot to send a text, 3 miles after the on-ramp incident. I can still see a 1’ oil stain where I stopped to text and a 4” oil trail out of the parking lot continuing 3 miles until I pulled over!

Since there was no oil trail into the first lot that has to be where the leak started. All I did was drop the kickstand, send the text, then head back out. Crazy.

Thx for checking your bike StarrRider. Much appreciated. And thx to everyone for their comments. I’ll add more info when I get it. The plot thickens...
 

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Discussion Starter #24
find another mechanic. a much Better ONE.

that is no way to treat a customer

to tell a customer the engine block is cracked, WITHOUT a proper investigation
vacuum test.
oil pressure test.
air pressure test.
chemical die test.
but FIRST a proper and complete cleaning of the engine is the first step.
These are great ideas. Thx Silver F.
 

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2007 VTX 1300R, Indianapolis
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The 1300 bikes will blow the seal by shifter if crankcase vent is clogged.
No idea what you have on the bike many people use aftermarket air intake and shove the crankcase vent into a filter down low. If that was under water it would have blown out a seal somewhere.
Just a thought with no idea how your bike is setup.
 

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These are great ideas. Thx Silver F.
fyi, I worked for a Honda motorcycle dealership for 20 years.
I have seen people crack the engine block by tightening the oil drain plug...
or break a hole in the block by hitting a large rock to front of engine.. both were VTX1300s ..

best of luck with insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
The 1300 bikes will blow the seal by shifter if crankcase vent is clogged.
No idea what you have on the bike many people use aftermarket air intake and shove the crankcase vent into a filter down low. If that was under water it would have blown out a seal somewhere.
Just a thought with no idea how your bike is setup.
I think mine is pretty low so it was definitely under water. Thx for the suggestion Indy.
 

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Continuing IndyX's line of thought - Is it possible that you did some work on the airbox or carb shortly before the ride in which it leaked oil? If so, you may have pinched the crankcase breather/vent hose resulting in a build-up of pressure and a blown shifter seal.
 
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Discussion Starter #29
I think mine is pretty low so it was definitely under water. Thx for the suggestion Indy.
[/
I think mine is pretty low so it was definitely under water. Thx for the suggestion Indy.
QUOTE]
IndyX! I was researching the crankcase breather and found some more clues...

In order for the PCV system to sweep fumes out of the crankcase, the crankcase must have a source of fresh air. The source of this fresh air is the "crankcase breather", which is usually ducted from the engine's intake manifold.

The PCV valve controls the flow of crankcase gases entering the intake system. At idle, the manifold vacuum is high, which would draw in a large quantity of crankcase gases, causing the engine to run too lean. The PCV valve closes when the manifold vacuum is high, restricting the quantity of crankcase gases entering the intake system.[9]
When the engine is under load or operating at higher RPM, a higher quantity of blow-by gases are produced. The intake manifold vacuum is lower in these conditions, which causes the PCV valve to open and the crankcase gases flow to the intake system.[10] The greater flow rate of intake air during these conditions means that a greater quantity of blow-by gases can be added to the intake system without compromising the operation of the engine. The opening of the PCV valve during these conditions also
In order for the PCV system to sweep fumes out of the crankcase, the crankcase must have a source of fresh air. The source of this fresh air is the "crankcase breather", which is usually ducted from the engine's intake manifold.

The PCV valve controls the flow of crankcase gases entering the intake system. At idle, the manifold vacuum is high, which would draw in a large quantity of crankcase gases, causing the engine to run too lean. The PCV valve closes when the manifold vacuum is high, restricting the quantity of crankcase gases entering the intake system.[9]
When the engine is under load or operating at higher RPM, a higher quantity of blow-by gases are produced. The intake manifold vacuum is lower in these conditions, which causes the PCV valve to open and the crankcase gases flow to the intake system.[10] The greater flow rate of intake air during these conditions means that a greater quantity of blow-by gases can be added to the intake system without compromising the operation of the engine. The opening of the PCV valve during these conditions also compensates for the intake system being less effective at drawing crankcase gases into the intake system in these conditions.
ompensates for the intake system being less effective at drawing crankcase gases into the intake system in these conditions.”

The oil did not start leaking until I put the bike in neutral when I pulled over to send that text. At that point the intake vacuum was high and perhaps the water in the breather tube caused that seal to blow. So it’s a “shifter seal”?
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Continuing IndyX's line of thought - Is it possible that you did some work on the airbox or carb shortly before the ride in which it leaked oil? If so, you may have pinched the crankcase breather/vent hose resulting in a build-up of pressure and a blown shifter seal.
Thanks for the reply Vinish. No work done recently. Check my reply to IndyX, I definitely think we are onto something with this crankcase breather.
 

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If it’s the seal you’ll be able to tell pretty easily it should be real obvious!!!! Mine blew from a pinched breather and it was hanging on the rod.
 

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Normally it vents into the air box. I don't think you had water that high?
It's only an issue when you have aftermarket air intake and a separate crankcase filter mounted low that it might have possibly gotten wet.
The normal mounting I don't think it would have been wet to cause issues.

I didn't mean it was this issue specifically either but I was trying to say that it could just be a simple failed seal somewhere that is repairable.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
If it’s the seal you’ll be able to tell pretty easily it should be real obvious!!!! Mine blew from a pinched breather and it was hanging on the rod.
Thx ironmk. So I just pop off the crankcase and it should be pretty easy to find, eh?
 

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Yep pull of the left side back cover and you’ll see the shaft your shifter is hooked to and should be able to trace the oil back to there if that’s the culprit
And if that is the culprit, just push it back in and then find the kink or obstruction in the hose
 
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Discussion Starter #36
Ok, finally got the bike back today. First thing I did was pull the crankcase cover to get to that shifter shaft seal! Unfortunately it looks fine AND there's some kind of retainer around it so I'm not sure if that could even slip off if it wanted to (see Pic1). However I did add compressed air to the oil fill and immediately saw oil leaking around the nut on the back of the K&N filter. I also checked the breather tube (PIc2, bottom right of pic). I did the test where you place a tissue over the oil fill while blowing on the tube. It seems blocked to me. Tissue didn't move and my eyes almost popped out of my head. It seems like I took up water into the tube, pressure built and partially blew out my oil filter. Would you guys agree? SO, it looks like I can get to the breather tube if I can get the air filter housing off. That's my next step unless you all have any other suggestions. And last, but far from least, I want to thank you all for all your help during this. I really thought the bike was done for and it may have been if not for the help I got from all of you. It warms my heart to know that there are still so many good people in the world (especially given the recent riots, pandemics, etc. etc. etc.). Thank you guys SO MUCH!
 

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Try the pics again not seeing.

K&N had a recall for those filters with nuts on them. Weak welds common failure point. I would recommend avoiding any filter with nut end.
 

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Hey everyone.
Tragedy struck 2 days ago when I got caught in a summer storm and road through a huge puddle (1 foot deep). Somehow this cracked the motor (underneath, where the left and right side come together) and my mechanic is telling me I need a new motor. It’s a 2008 VTX 1800F with only 12k miles. It’s my first bike and I don’t want to part with it. Any advice on finding a used motor? Do you think it’s worth it? Most have 40k miles on them and who knows how well they run? I’d have to get someone to install it as well.

Either that or I find another used VTX 1800 (Full bike) and say goodbye to this one.

thanks for any advice you have.
Super bummed out.
-paul
I'm sure if you look on eBay you will find a used engine.
 

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The 1300 bikes will blow the seal by shifter if crankcase vent is clogged.
No idea what you have on the bike many people use aftermarket air intake and shove the crankcase vent into a filter down low. If that was under water it would have blown out a seal somewhere.
Just a thought with no idea how your bike is setup.
 
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