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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. I've been gone a while and been off my bike too like the title says. I lost a good buddy at the beginning of the year on his bike and lost the nerve to even get on mine. Its sat up not quite a year now, rode it a few times before the accident. Well now my brother just got a bike and ridin his back from the dealership made me miss mine like a fat kid misses ice cream. I tried to start it and the lights came on but wouldnt crank over. I know the battery needs to at least be recharged or replaced. But what other things do I need to do to get my baby back on the road?

Thanks,
Chris
 

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Dragon Slayer
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8,515 Posts
I would start with replacing all the fluids first, while doing that, maybe put battery on a tender, or take it to be tested (under load for true reading). Probly need to clean the carb while you're at it too.
 

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I would say a fresh battery, plugs, drain the carb & tank and refill before trying to start it along with an oil change. Then once it's back running before you ride it check the air pressure in the tires and make sure there not dry rotted.
(I'm sure I'm missing something though...)
 

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Equito Passim
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9,148 Posts
I was told that gas doesnt start breaking down for a year.
Well, heres the problem with that.

You have no idea how old that fuel was when you bought it. It could have been stored from weeks to months before it even got to the truck to deliver it to you station.

Two things happen to fuel.

1) It starts to oxidize - hydrocarbons in the fuel react with oxygen to produce new compounds, almost all of them worse than what you started with. When oxidation becomes a problem, you'll know it without lab tests — the gasoline gives off a sour odor.

2) The lighter chemicals in it evaporate, leaving behind a heavier, less volatile product. Gasoline is an ideal motor vehicle fuel partly because it vaporizes readily to form a combustible mix with air. If it sits unused, however, its more volatile components evaporate away, leading to poorer engine performance.

Both of these things begin happening right away.. Fuel can, theoretically, last up to a year. But, you don't know how old it is to begin with, and the longer the fuel sits idle, the more of a chance the fuel will clog the jets inside the carb, negating whether or not the fuel is still flammable enough to run the engine.





Put the battery on a tender.
Change the oil.
Inspect the plugs, replace or clean if necessary.
Remove the fuel from the bike and replace it with new.
Check the tires air pressure, and visually for signs of dry rot.
Cross your fingers and hope your jets aren't clogged.

-Gonz
 

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Well, heres the problem with that.

You have no idea how old that fuel was when you bought it. It could have been stored from weeks to months before it even got to the truck to deliver it to you station.

Two things happen to fuel.

1) It starts to oxidize - hydrocarbons in the fuel react with oxygen to produce new compounds, almost all of them worse than what you started with. When oxidation becomes a problem, you'll know it without lab tests — the gasoline gives off a sour odor.

2) The lighter chemicals in it evaporate, leaving behind a heavier, less volatile product. Gasoline is an ideal motor vehicle fuel partly because it vaporizes readily to form a combustible mix with air. If it sits unused, however, its more volatile components evaporate away, leading to poorer engine performance.

Both of these things begin happening right away.. Fuel can, theoretically, last up to a year. But, you don't know how old it is to begin with, and the longer the fuel sits idle, the more of a chance the fuel will clog the jets inside the carb, negating whether or not the fuel is still flammable enough to run the engine.





Put the battery on a tender.
Change the oil.
Inspect the plugs, replace or clean if necessary.
Remove the fuel from the bike and replace it with new.
Check the tires air pressure, and visually for signs of dry rot.
Cross your fingers and hope your jets aren't clogged.

-Gonz
Excellent point!!
 

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i'd charge or replace battery,change oil and try and see if it starts.if starts run it for awhile(warm) then change plugs new gas etc.
 

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Another thing I would recommend to operate electrical switches numerous times including pressing horn switch with ignition switch off to wipe (clean) the contacts. Also press front brake lever, clutch and rear brake pedal numerous times for same reason. After starting the engine, I would repeat the above with current flowing and inspect to see all lights, horn and etc. are working properly prior getting on the street. Wishing all a nice day.
 
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