Honda VTX 1300 / VTX 1800 Motorcycles Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Puppy Wrangler
Joined
·
749 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been hitting this place, pure accident we found it, for about 2 months. Its an Indian Fusion joint and I was blown away. Im a steak and potatoes kinda guy so Id never considered anything of this nature. My fiance loves ethnic food and I wasnt much in the way of company when we'd go. Pho and the other types we tried just werent my thing. So far, Im up to about 9 dishes that I dig eating. And the service in this place is the best. The manager/owner, now knows us and we have a "table". Cool I know right?!? And he has talked me up to eating all my favorites at medium spice level. Course a Zantac helps but its worth it. Butter Chicken to Chicken Tiki Masala and Ive even tried the Curry goat. Theres a grand opening thing going on tonight with an all day buffet. You know where Im going for dinner.
 

·
Puppy Wrangler
Joined
·
749 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It took me so long cause I had a bad experience with curry in Jamaican food. They use WAY too much from what Ive tried.
 

·
Liberal Peace-Lover
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
If they make a Dal Makhani you should try it- "butter lentils" are one of my favorite dishes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,674 Posts
I spent the first two weeks of September in India and ate mostly local food. It was quite good. I like what they did with the hot food. As far as I know, all hot food gets its heat from the same chemical, Capsaican (sp?). This is true of the Indian peppers as well as the more common in the USA "Mexican" peppers like jalapenos and habeneros. I thought that the subtle blend of other spices present with the hot spice in the Indian food was far superior to the rather one-track hot taste in Mexican and Tex-Mex.

My absolute favorite was the Nan - a thin but chewy bread.

G'day,

Vinish
 

·
shock factor unrated
Joined
·
12,435 Posts
If they make a Dal Makhani you should try it- "butter lentils" are one of my favorite dishes.
i second that motion!!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,072 Posts
It took me so long cause I had a bad experience with curry in Jamaican food. They use WAY too much from what Ive tried.
"curry" is MOL a generic American cultural term that has been misused to describe spices and techniques used in original traditional cuisines and the precise selection of spices depends on the chef ...

"Curry powder" is a commercial term for an 18th century combination of British colonial spices ... and ... chances are ... you know about "British colonial " food ...

So ...

... chances are ...

... you've had some bad experiences with some "chefs" ... rather than with "curry" ...

You rarely get "curry" in the United States because you can't get Thai, Indian and Pakistani fresh produce in season as it was meant to be prepared ...

But ...

... a good chef can whip you up some good victuals approximating herbs and spices to taste using the best of local produce ...

but ...

... this is a valuable skill so you will probably have to pay top dollar for it ...

... and know where to shop ...

some folks like Mc Ribs ...

some folks don't ...

but it has absolutely nothing to do with "soul food" ...

Same thing goes for "curry" ...

If you get my drifteroonie ...

but ...

opinions vary ...

all blessings ...

crew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I also love Indian food, I used to work at a large IT company that employed a large number of Indian nationals, one of our female Indian co workers invited my team over to her house one day for lunch and to experience "home cooked" Indian food. I was hooked!! I try to hit up alot of ethnic foods whenever I can but my wife is more of the meat and potatoes kind of person.

BTW Dave, I think I remember that this is Woodbridge VA correct? Speaking of ethnic foods, (Shameless plug time for an old friend) if you like rotisserie chicken hit up El Pollo Rico on Minneville Rd. It is by far the best roisserie chicken I have ever had, done with their grandmother's recipe from Peru. Ask for Ivan, tell him John Hanna sent you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Try Indian some time for breakfast. They have a popular dish from southern India called a Dosa. My personal favorite is the Masala Dosa. Imagine a very thin, slightly crispy pancake twice the size of the plate that is rolled up like a burrito around some potatoes. It usually comes with two dipping sauces and a small soup.

I went to India two years ago and stayed for a month. I ate that every morning for about 20 cents US. I loved it so much, I found a local indian market that serves food. I still have it for breakfast every Saturday.

Wash it down with a Mango Lasse.

(I'm totally drooling now.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
[h=1]What is the difference between south indian and north indian food?[/h]im sorta familiar with indian food, but I dont know how to tell north indian from south indian food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
In the north, they eat more meat. The south eats more veggetarian and fish dishes. You'll also find more rice based dishes and coconut based sides. Think more tropical stuff with the ocean in close proximity.

Southern food is usually more spicy, which is why I love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Double thumbs up on the naan and the dosa! I spent time in India a few years back as well and my friends/coworkers there took me to some amazing places. The best part is the way they strategically use garlic or ginger for digestion and coconut or dairy to soothe the heat, etc... So while its spicy I never had issues coming out OK at the end of the meal.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top