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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I have a decent tool set at the house with most of the normal the standard and metric sizes. I'd like to do a tear down (wheels, tins, front fork, and handle bars mainly) over the winter break and just don't want to get caught without a required tool. What have you guys run into?
 

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Cant remember what size it is but it takes a big ass wrench to get that rear axle bolt off. Also the nuts on the forks are 22mm I think. Helps to have a torque wrench too.
Oh and if anyone wants to know what to get me for Christmas I'd love to have a nice set of T-handle allens.
 

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Liberal Peace-Lover
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Instead of the 22 mm for the axle bolt, I think I used a 7/8. A torque wrench is a very good idea for the things you are describing. There are a lot of critical bolts in the front end including the caliper bolts, both fork pinch bolts, axle, axle pinch bolts, etc. Some additional tools you will need are a 30 mm socket for the center bolt of the steering column. You will need several homemade tools if you are changing the steering bearings. You may need a very large allen wrench to hold the front axle while unscrewing the front axle bolt. Instead of buying this, make one from a bolt whose head is the right size for the allen hole and then jam two nuts together on the threads. I've had the front end quite a bit apart and not needed a bearing puller. However, if you were going to remove the wheel bearings, you might need one. In general, the wheel bearings don't need maintenance or replacement very often. For the rear axle nut, I used a large adjustable crescent wrench. I made sure it was adjusted very tight on the nut before turning it. This does prevent you from achieving proper torque on that fastener during assembly. A rubber mallet is quite helpful in persuading the top triple tree to come on and off as well as in removing the forks from the triple tree and chrome covers (if it is an R or S model).

G'day,

Vinish
 

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I just bought some new metric tools for my bike so I can put them in my saddlebag.

1. Metric Combo Wrenches
2. Metric Allen Wrenches with handle
3. Metric 3/8 Socket Set
4. 1 Pair Of Pliers
5. 1 Screw Driver
6. 1 Phillips Screw Driver
7. 1 Pair Of Vice Grips
8. 1 Small pair of Needle Nose Pliers!
9. Small funnel with tube for anti-freeze
10. 1 quart of anti-freeze

Also:

1. 12 Volt Air Pump
2. 1 Can of fix a flat
3. Extra fuses!!
4. Extra Clutch Cable!

Hope That Helps!
 

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Slayer of Chickens
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Be happy it's a Honda, for my Harley I have Torx, Standard, and get this, metric tools... yes, my Harley has metric bolts here and there.

Mort
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cool, Thanks guys. I just removed the wheels, the front and back fenders as well. The wheels will be going into powder coating later this week ($100 a piece), not sure when the paint for the fenders and tank will be done ( have to find some good prices, will be looking over the next few months )

I've seen a bunch of posts on polished forks, they look great, but im not too keen on the up keep ( hence the powder coating on the wheels )

Also, does anyone know where to get a set of bars (that look similar to the "C" that allow for the wires to be ran inside?
 

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When reinstalling the rear fender take GREAT care to not scratch the new paint as you slide it in between the two frame prongs. While you still have the rear fender (prior to painting), practice sliding this fender in 5-10 times. There is an angle of approach and a slight rotation of the fender that minimizes the chance of scratching it as it is slid into place. Another alternative is to put painters tape on the fender or the frame prongs. I tried this but could not figure out how to get the tape off of the area between the frame prongs and the fender. I suppose you could just leave the tape in place. It will be hidden by the chrome fender rails but this didn't seem "right" to me.

For the front wheel, if you have removed the forks from the triple tree, the installation of the fender onto the forks is trivial and without risk to the new paint. However, if you have not removed the forks, there is an important trick to getting the fender into place. You have to slide one fork down enough or the fender up enough to get the short cross portion of one fork that has the bolt holes below the fender. You then rotate that fork 180 degrees. The fender can then be removed. This process is described in the service manual. You did download the service manual didn't you?

I'm one of the people who just polished the aluminum fork lowers on a 1300S. Time will tell how much upkeep is needed. I've heard two conflicting stories. One person says they will need slightly repolished every year. Another says they will be good for 2-3 years if you keep them washed and waxed. I guess I will see for myself which story is correct.

I ran the wires internal in the stock bars for a 1300S. It was not that tough although there were a number of learnings and tricks that I discovered. If you get ready to do this, ask again or PM me and I'll share what I learned. You can buy bars that are predrilled for internal wires. I think that for Honda's this just means they have one or two outlet holes in the horizontal portion of the handlebar between the two risers.

Good luck and G'day,

Vinish
 

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The guitar, not the fish!
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When reinstalling the rear fender take GREAT care to not scratch the new paint as you slide it in between the two frame prongs. While you still have the rear fender (prior to painting), practice sliding this fender in 5-10 times. There is an angle of approach and a slight rotation of the fender that minimizes the chance of scratching it as it is slid into place. Another alternative is to put painters tape on the fender or the frame prongs.

You should have done it the right way to begin with and saved alot of time and frustration....Remove ONE rear shock, along with the upper shock mount (allen head inside it), and the chrome fender strut...Makes putting the newly painted rear fender back on MUCH easier...
 

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You should have done it the right way to begin with and saved alot of time and frustration....Remove ONE rear shock, along with the upper shock mount (allen head inside it), and the chrome fender strut...Makes putting the newly painted rear fender back on MUCH easier...
Bassdude, I did that and more. I removed both shocks and braced the rear wheel on some wood. I'm not talking about fitting the fender between the chrome fender rails but, rather, between the black frame prongs that are under the front about one-third of the chrome fender rails. Mylilpony's fender was a VERY tight fit between these frame prongs.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I did notice as I was trying to wiggle the rear fender out of place that it was going to be an interesting re-installation after paint. Il take your advice and do some practice runs before its painted.
 

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The guitar, not the fish!
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Bassdude, I did that and more. I removed both shocks and braced the rear wheel on some wood. I'm not talking about fitting the fender between the chrome fender rails but, rather, between the black frame prongs that are under the front about one-third of the chrome fender rails. Mylilpony's fender was a VERY tight fit between these frame prongs.

G'day,

Vinish
Hmmm....I had no problem putting mine back in place...Needed Jenny to help hold it while I got the bolts started, but we got it done with no cursing needed...lol....
 

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Clearly mine is bigger and I have more problems fitting it into tight places :)

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Wow you must have big bags :)

Nice colorado logo there too!

I have the 1300S with the spoke wheel ( innertube ), I wanted to get a can of fix a flat, but it says on the can to not use on inner tubes - maybe I should get one anyway? I did make sure that I have tow coverage with my insurance just because of this issue.

I just bought some new metric tools for my bike so I can put them in my saddlebag.

1. Metric Combo Wrenches
2. Metric Allen Wrenches with handle
3. Metric 3/8 Socket Set
4. 1 Pair Of Pliers
5. 1 Screw Driver
6. 1 Phillips Screw Driver
7. 1 Pair Of Vice Grips
8. 1 Small pair of Needle Nose Pliers!
9. Small funnel with tube for anti-freeze
10. 1 quart of anti-freeze

Also:

1. 12 Volt Air Pump
2. 1 Can of fix a flat
3. Extra fuses!!
4. Extra Clutch Cable!

Hope That Helps!
 

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The guitar, not the fish!
Joined
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33,457 Posts
Clearly mine is bigger and I have more problems fitting it into tight places :)

G'day,

Vinish
Actually I think it's just that my experience and expertise allows me to fit it in there without needing "practice runs"....:mosh:



We are still talking about the rear fender, right??.....:hmm2:
 

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Actually I think it's just that my experience and expertise allows me to fit it in there without needing "practice runs"....:mosh:



We are still talking about the rear fender, right??.....:hmm2:
Absolutely
 
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