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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I want to tackle this job over the winter. Anyone in utah thats done this that can help? Make it worth your time. I’ve done bicycle headset and forks etc for years, looks similar in general.

OR

recommend a shop that could do it and what the cost is give or take?

THANKS ALL!
 

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I'm too far to help in person but would be happy to correspond via PM (now called "conversations") to discuss how to do it. I have done a lot of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Everyone here is so great to jump in to lend a hand so quick!

JD, I agree and those are always on the table! Are you in the Area?

Thanks Vinish! I think the biggest issues would be removing the old crown race and getting the lower race/bearing pressed onto the fork crown.

Im going to order the All balls bearings where do you guys recommend as a resource?

Thanks!
 

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Regrettably I am not, I am down in Okiehoma how ever I would most definitely be lending a hand

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well JD your help is VERY appreciated! I'm going to look into getting the bearings.

I am looking for specific tool suggestions and where to source the All Balls.

Thanks!
 

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I bought my roller bearings direct from All Balls Racing. https://www.allballsracing.com/22-1020.html $37

I have done this job on my 2005 VTX, and prior to that on my 2002 ST1100. It was essentially the same job. I am surprised that Honda did not address this, because it affects many Hondas, and it IS a safety issue.

Both the VTX and the ST1100 use the same bearing. You can find several threads here where fellow VTXers have shared their techniques. Here is how the job is done on an ST1100: Steering Head Bearing Replacement ( ST1100 )

The only specific tool needed is the castle nut wrench.

To remove the bearing race you can use a bearing puller, a press, or a piece of rebar.

To re-install the race I used a press made from threaded rod. I believe that Vinish feels strongly that you should use a hammer. It's your bike, you decide what works for you.
 

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I seem to recall buying them on Amazon. As far as the special tools needed, I recommend the following. All of these are easy to find/buy except one.

1) 4" x 4" x 1/4" thick steel plate - source from any metal supply place
2) 12" long by 1-5/8" outer diameter pipe nipple. The 1-5/8" dimension is the actual size not the nominal pipe size - source from any hardware store. It is a standard item.
3) A very large and long screwdriver - you may already have one or source from a hardware store
4) A 1/4" diameter solid steel rod about 12-15" in diameter - source from a hardware store
5) A castle nut socket specifically designed to fit the shape/grooves in the VTX1300 castle nut. This is not a store bought item. Some folks who have these will loan them out. The use of this item allows you to properly torque the castle nut to the target of 25 ft-lbs. If you cannot get one of these, you can just tighten the castle nut with large channel locks and guess at the torque achieved.
6) 3 lb short handled sledge hammer - probably already have one and, if not, source from any hardware store
7) Small cold chisel about 3/8" to 1/2" in width

Removing the old races is the hardest part of the job and pounding in the new races is the next hardest but these can all be readily accomplished. I recommend the method wherein the entire front of the bike (tire, wheel, fender, forks, and lower triple tree brace with the steering stem are removed as one item. The benefit to this approach is it minimizes the amount of disassembly that must be done. The drawback to this approach is that it takes at least one and, preferably, two helpers to remove this large heavy item and handle it while removing the old bottom race and installing the new race. This approach does not use a press and, instead, uses the hammer and steel plate or the hammer and pipe nipple to pound in the new races. It does not use a race/pully puller and, instead, uses the large screwdriver, the metal rod, and the hammer to drive out the old races.

Note that you must keep the three old races that you remove as these will be used to help install the new races.

If you decide to undertake this project, I would be happy to talk you through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Vinish,

This is a great writeup and makes sense. The other threads with pictures help too but I like the idea of taking the whole lower off together instead of a major disassemble. I am thinking that I will do that but remove the wheel first and just work with the fork itself. That's how I have done bicycle headsets. Thoughts on that? Would remove a good deal of weight when trying to work with it the bearing races. I know amazon has a frame race tool that expands and has a lip...you can then put a bar or punch against it and knock them out. Its the fork crown that's an issue and ive seen people Dremel that and Id rather not. I think I can use a chisel and hammer to get under the edge of it and tap it until it comes up.

I will start sourcing these items you mention. Id love to get one of the castle nut tools for correct torque. That's always something i want to have correct for piece of mind. If anyone has one for rent/borrow that would be great. I'm not in a huge hurry but am going to order the bearings today.

Thank you all!!
 

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How you choose to handle the bike front end is your call. There are pros and cons to leaving it all together. Certainly removing the tire/wheel reduces the weight. However, having the wheel/tire present makes it pretty easy for a helper to hold the assembly upright and resting on the tire. I am not sure what you mean by the "fork crown". If you mean the race that sits on the steering stem shaft that is attached to the lower triple tree brace (i.e. that would come off with the bike front end), then this is the easiest of the three races to remove. Do NOT use a Dremel on it when it is on the bike. This will likely damage the surrounding metal of the lower triple tree brace and the steering stem and is completely unnecessary. Instead, use the cold chisel and the 3 lb sledge and drive the chisel at a 90“ angle to the stem into the groove between this race and the lower triple tree brace. Once the chisel has moved the race upwards about 1/8", you can fit the end of the 1/4" diameter metal rod (acting as a drift) against the bottom of the race and tap the other end of the rod with the sledge to drive the race upward and out of its pressed in location. Position the rod/drift on multiple sides of the race as you tap to keep the race even as you drive it upwards.

Once the race is free of the shaft, you will have to cut a slot all the way through it. This is necessary because this old race will be used to press against the new race as you drive the new race into position. The order of tools/items for driving on this race is: new race, old race, pipe nipple, steel plate, sledge. The groove is needed in the old race to prevent it getting stuck on the shaft from which it was previously removed.

For removing the two races that are in the frame tube, you do NOT need a race, bearing, or pully puller. Instead, you use the large screwdriver, 1/4" diameter rod, and 3 lb sledge as shown in the attached drawing I made.

Handwriting Rectangle Font Slope Line
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When I say fork steerer, I do mean the race that sits on the steering shaft attached to the triple tree. I say "fork crown" because that's what they are called on a bicycle. The "fork" being the front suspension with the triple tree and steering stem shaft. I think a chisel setup like you describe is the best and its the same way a race is taken off of a bicycle fork. I think a Dremel there is a bad idea whether on the bike frame or not. The photo and description is great too. the upper and lower frame race removal on a bicycle is done almost exactly the same way. This is just on a "larger" scale.

Bearings are ordered. am going to go get some of the "tools" later today too. Ill keep you all updated! Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looking for the 12” by 1-5/8 nipple, just finding 1-1/4 at the big hardware stores, suggestions?
 

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Yes, almost certainly the NPS (nominal pipes size) of 1-1/4 inch has an actual outer diameter of 1-5/8 inches so that is probably the right item. Just take a tape measure with you or do what I do when I forget to bring one and borrow a tape measure from the hardware stores tape measure aisle to measure the pipe nipple diameter. I bet you it has an actual o.d. of 1-5/8".
 
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