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The wife and I have decided to go a few places and take our bikes but not ride them there, so we're looking to get a Trinity 3 Rail Motorcycle trailer. In the videos, the guy has no problem loading his cruiser using the ramp provided. I'm sure he has no problem because he's probably done it a hundred times.

So my question is this, for those of you who have had the opportunity to trailer your bike, how much skill does it really take to roll it onto the trailer? I've been riding for about 5 years now and have clocked over 44000 miles but have never had to roll up onto a trailer. Realistically, how likely am I to fall off the ramp or the trailer itself?
 

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~ High-Finesse Hooligan ~
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Here's pics of mine, a CycleHauler model. That rear tailgate is twice as long as it looks - see the hinges at the top? - it unfolds as it swings down to the ground. So I have a full-width, ~4-ft. long, grated ramp to drive up. Very stable - trailer is about 950 lbs. empty - I just ride right up, no problem. The one that you mention, if I saw the right video, has a narrow ramp that you must navigate to get to the deck - that might take some practice and technique development on your part...



'laser :patriot:
 

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first check the carrying capacity of the trailer. 2 cruisers... 1,400 pounds minimum .. so a 2,000 would be good.

the LOWER the trailer the better..

I have a 1 bike "nomanco" Low boy.. with 4 inch drop axle... so real easy.. they make a 3 bike version.. I have not seen one...

a full floor should be mandatory... my opinion.
 

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I have a 5x8 trailer with a metal floor that I mounted a chock I bought from Harbor Freight on. I bought ramps when I bought the chock and when I load my bike I place one ramp in line with the chock and one in line with where my left foot will be. That way when I am pulling up I have a balance point. I took a break from riding for over 20 some years and have had no problem loading or unloading my bike. If you don't have a full width ramp I would suggest something like this. I also do this when I'm putting my bike into it's building. I connected two ramps side by side for the bike and have one off to the side for my foot for balance. Works for me but like everything else it really depends on how you do things and your balance. I would also suggest getting a locking chock for your trailer. Mine has a locking plate that comes up behind the front tire when you roll up onto it and you don't have to hold it up or have help holding it up while you are tying it down. I love this set up. Good luck getting your system figured out and be safe. Peace.
 

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team VTX cafe physician
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make sure the trailer has a way to hold the back end up so it doesn't collapse under the weight of the bikes when loading.....mine has extensions that come to the ground and hold the trailer in position.....and make sure you use them always!! Otherwise, it's a matter of getting the bikes in and positioning them....I would put a block under the frame ( I use two 2x6's taped together) to prevent too much pressure on the forks. it will help hold the bikes in place, too.
 

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Hello,
I am 53 and have been riding and loading bikes most of my life. With the trailer hooked to your vehicle, you can either ride it up the ramp (if you have a nice, wide ramp) -or, with the bike in low gear, you can gently slip the clutch while walking beside the bike -letting the bike do all the work. Both methods require a good quality, wide ramp of some sort (or two ramps).
It's not as daunting as it may first appear. Once you do it a time or two, its no big deal.
 

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Had a small railed trailer before with narrow ramps and no decking (just channel). I 2nd all that has been said so far. Got rid of the trailer after 1 season as it was too difficult to ride the bike onto it.
 
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