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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought an 04 VTX1300S, hasn’t been on road since 08, so I’m cleaning the rusty tank, petcock (tubes and fuel filter rusted off and separated inside the tank)… so replaced petcock, cleaning/rebuilding Carb, replacing all fluids. Adding Highway bars, lower and upper fairings, new tires.

So my question, visible rust in the tank, so emptied old fuel and Filled with water, to rinse… lots of loose rust, pieces of the petcock have come out, but I can’t seem to get all the liquid out no matter how I rotate the tank…this is without the petcock in or the fuel cap on, are there baffles in the tank? Anyone have a diagram of the tanks internal layout?
Good news is the vent pipe is clean, and free flowing.
It’s filled with vinegar currently to eat the rest of the rust, and I have gold tank coating to go in, but I would like to make sure I can get all the liquid out first.
Thanks in advance
Adam
 

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After I drain the Vinegar and rinse with soap and water to neutralize the acid, I will fill then flush with clean water and then put the compressor on it to blow through the tank to try to get the most liquid out I can, once that's complete the heat gun will go into the fuel entrance and i'll leave that on to dry it as quickly and thouroughly as possible.
 

· Reeling Jackwagon
2003 1300S
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I've never had to clean a tank but had to clean metal parts at a machine shop I used to work at. Soap and water to clean the oil and crud off the parts and the rinse with water and then denatured ethanol to get rid of the water.

Alcohol will absorb water on the molecular level and evaporate much quicker. If it were me I would rinse with water as you described and then with half a bottle of 91% rubbing alcohol and air then again with alcohol.
 

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cooling vinegar is only 6% acedic acid. If you go to Lowes or Walmart, in the garden chemical section, you will find 30% acedic acid. Takes a long time for the cooking vinegar to work. Rinsing with water and then alchohol sounds like a good idea.
 

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I use one of the little tools where you press one in and four little grabbers come out of the other. About 2 feet long. Ball up part of a paper towel and use a grabber to insert down to the tank and still be able to pull out to help soak up water/liquid
 

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2007 Honda VTX1300 S
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After I drain the Vinegar and rinse with soap and water to neutralize the acid, I will fill then flush with clean water and then put the compressor on it to blow through the tank to try to get the most liquid out I can, once that's complete the heat gun will go into the fuel entrance and i'll leave that on to dry it as quickly and thouroughly as possible.
I used a hair dryer and a rubber band to hold the hair dryer against the fuel opening. Worked like a charm.

I would strongly encourage you to reseal your tank using professional grade chemicals that dissolve the rust, prepare the metal, and permanently reseal the tank.

I did this on my 2007 after buying it last year with only 3500 miles on it. It sat for a long time. Fouled my carb, ruined my airbox, and more. Cleaned carb twice because I did not treat the problem... the fuel tank! I also recommend a rebuild kit for the carb, once done with the tank. But the tank should be first.


It just takes patience. I used hair dryer on hot setting, no petcock so air could escape, as described to dry the tank as appropriate. With the fuel tank sealer, I called POR and asked them about not being able to get all excess out. They said not to worry too much about it, just to keep turning the tank every few minutes for 2-3 hours so less pooled in the bottom of the tank. The easiest opening to drain is the fuel outlet (not the top of the tank). Most important is to dry and cure the sealant completely. More hair dryer action over two days to ensure the sealant was dry and cured, then open air for another 3-4 days.

Next, replace petcock with Honda-only OEM part. I used a cheap chinese knock-off, but it began to leak a few months after installation. So get OEM. It's pricier, but worth the $$.

Next, disassemble and clean your carb, and use a rebuild kit. Be sure to clean the carb well. I just used carb cleaner from O'Reilly's or Autozone parts stores in an aerosol can. This is easier than it sounds, TBH. Do it on a table on some sort of towel as there will be some random fuel in the carb. If you have a parts washer, you might use this. Of course, I'm fairly sure all gaskets/rubber pieces must be removed from the carb?

Next, install the air-fuel mixture screw extension kit (it's described here on the Cafe a lot - Glen's Perm A/F Screw ). You will find this immensely useful as you tune the carb after reinstallation. Be sure all parts of the old a/f screw are removed (before you clean the carb). My o-ring was a sticky lump (don't know why... assume someone used brake clean to clean the carb only 5-6 months before I bought the bike).

I recommend that you also buy an inexpensive tachometer (I got mine on Amazon) to help you gauge RPMs as you adjust the A/F mixture. Cost is about $25. Easy to use as it uses induction on a spark plug. I attached a battery clip to mine so it grips the cable and actually left the tach on my bike (for now).

Finally, check the large diameter rubber vacuum hose which attaches to the airbox and runs across the bike up to the valve on the opposite side of the frame. Mine was so bad it was chunking out of the hose like charcoal. It was very soft in the corners. You might check if yours is doing same. I do not know if this was caused by age or by the fuel-flooded carb. Replace the hose if needed.

This was a learning experience for me. Worst case scenario, I figured, was that I could take it to a shop if needed as a last resort.

Hope this helps!
 

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Honda VTX 1300C
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Bought an 04 VTX1300S, hasn’t been on road since 08, so I’m cleaning the rusty tank, petcock (tubes and fuel filter rusted off and separated inside the tank)… so replaced petcock, cleaning/rebuilding Carb, replacing all fluids. Adding Highway bars, lower and upper fairings, new tires.

So my question, visible rust in the tank, so emptied old fuel and Filled with water, to rinse… lots of loose rust, pieces of the petcock have come out, but I can’t seem to get all the liquid out no matter how I rotate the tank…this is without the petcock in or the fuel cap on, are there baffles in the tank? Anyone have a diagram of the tanks internal layout?
Good news is the vent pipe is clean, and free flowing.
It’s filled with vinegar currently to eat the rest of the rust, and I have gold tank coating to go in, but I would like to make sure I can get all the liquid out first.
Thanks in advance
Adam
Absolute alcohol works best. Displaces the water and evaporates what won’t drain out
 

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Honda VTX 1300C
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I agree with absolute alcohol after water rinse and with need for STRONG VINEGAR. Household didn’t work for me. Be care with the tank liner you decide to use. I followed the instructions carefully and ended up with a plugged vent line and had to buy a new used tank.
 

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Hey, I'm late to the party but back when I was a kid, I put a couple handfuls of small sharp gravel in the tank and shook it like crazy to get the big rust. I agree with the rest. I've had success with POR-15 on a '72 CB 450.
 
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